Thursday, October 3, 2013

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images Biography

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Anna Akhmatova is regarded as one of the greatest Russian poets. Besides poetry, which constitutes the lion’s share of her literary legacy, she wrote prose—primarily memoirs, autobiographical pieces, and literary scholarship, including her outstanding essays on Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin. She also produced many first-rate translations of Italian, French, Armenian, and Korean poetry. In her lifetime Akhmatova experienced two different kinds of Russia, prerevolutionary and Soviet, yet her verse protected the traditions of classical Russian culture from the onslaught of avant-garde radicalism and formal experimentation, as well as from the suffocating ideological strictures of socialist realism. For all the restraint, femininity, and ostensible apoliticism of her verse, her poetic persona perfectly embodied the tragic spirit of twentieth-century Russia. In many respects she shared the archetypal poetic fate that befell many of her brilliant contemporaries, including Osip Emil’evich Mandel’shtam, Boris Leonidovich Pasternak, and Marina Ivanovna Tsvetaeva. Although she lived a long life, it was darkened disproportionately by calamitous moments. Isaiah Berlin, who visited Akhmatova in her Leningrad apartment in November 1945 while serving in Russia as first secretary of the British embassy, aptly described her as a tragic queen,” according to György Dalos. Akhmatova’s regal bearing, tempered by an aura of sadness, was in fact her key identifying feature: this image is conveyed through her verse and in scores of memoirs and prose portraits. For several generations of readers, she has been an iconic representation of noble beauty and catastrophic predicament.

Akhmatova was proud of her aristocratic roots and traced them not only to real but also to legendary ancestors. She was born Anna Andreevna Gorenko on 11 June 1889 in Bol’shoi Fontan, near the Black Sea, to an upper-class family; she was the third of six children. Her mother, Inna Erazmovna Stogova, belonged to a powerful clan of landowners, while her father, Andrei Antonovich Gorenko, had received his title from his own father, who had been created a hereditary noble for service in the royal navy. Gorenko grew up in Tsarskoe Selo (literally, Tsar’s Village), a glamorous suburb of St. Petersburg—site of an opulent royal summer residence and of splendid mansions belonging to Russian aristocrats. Tsarskoe Selo was also where, in 1903, she met her future husband, the poet Nikolai Stepanovich Gumilev, while shopping for Christmas presents in Gostinyi Dvor, a large department store. This first encounter made a much stronger impression on Gumilev than on Gorenko, and he wooed her persistently for years, occasionally attempting suicide in desperation. In Tsarskoe Selo, Gorenko attended the women’s Mariinskaia gymnasium yet completed her final year at Fundukleevskaia gymnasium in Kiev, where she graduated in May 1907; she and her mother had moved to Kiev after Inna Erazmovna’s separation from Andrei Antonovich. In 1907 Gorenko enrolled in the Department of Law at Kiev College for Women but soon abandoned her legal studies in favor of literary pursuits.

Gorenko began writing verse as a teenager. Although she did not fancy Gumilev at first, she often heeded his advice on poetry. He heavily edited her first published poem, which appeared in 1907 in the second issue of Sirius, the journal that Gumilev founded in Paris. She signed this poem, “Na ruke ego mnogo blestiashchikh kolets” (translated as “On his hand are lots of shining rings,” 1990), with her real name, Anna Gorenko. Eventually, however, she took the pseudonym Akhmatova. The pen name came from her belief that one of her maternal ancestors was Khan Akhmat, the last Tatar chieftain to accept tribute from Russian rulers. According to the family mythology, Akhmat—who was assassinated in his tent in 1481—belonged to the royal bloodline of Genghis Khan.

In November 1909 Gumilev visited Akhmatova in Kiev and, after repeatedly rejecting his attentions, she finally agreed to marry him. The wedding ceremony took place in Kiev in the church of Nikol’ska Slobodka on 25 April 1910. The couple spent their honeymoon in Paris, where Akhmatova was introduced to Amedeo Modigliani, at the time an unknown and struggling Italian painter. The encounter was perhaps one of the most extraordinary events of Akhmatova’s youth. Modigliani wrote her letters throughout the winter, and they met again when she returned to Paris in 1911. Akhmatova stayed in Paris for several weeks that time, renting an apartment near the church of St. Sulpice and exploring the parks, museums, and cafés of Paris with her enigmatic companion. The addressee of the poem “Mne s toboiu p’ianym veselo” (published in Vecher, 1912; translated as “When you’re drunk it’s so much fun,” 1990) has been identified as Modigliani. In the lyric the autumnal color of the elms is a deliberate shifting of seasons on the part of the poetess, who left Paris long before the end of summer: “When you’re drunk it’s so much fun—/ Your stories don’t make sense. / An early fall has strung / The elms with yellow flags.” Modigliani made sixteen drawings of Akhmatova in the nude, one of which remained with her until her death; it always hung above her sofa in whatever room she occupied during her frequently unsettled life.

Around this time Gumilev emerged as the leader of an eclectic and loosely knit literary group, ambitiously dubbed “Acmeism” (from the Greek akme, meaning pinnacle, or the time of flowering). Acmeism rose in opposition to the preceding literary school, Symbolism, which was in decline after dominating the Russian literary scene for almost two decades. The hallmark Symbolist features were the overuse of metaphorical language, belief in divine inspiration, and emphases on mysticism and religious philosophy. The Symbolists worshiped music as the most spiritual art form and strove to convey the “music of divine spheres,” which was a common Symbolist phrase, through the medium of poetry. In contrast Gumilev and his fellow Acmeists turned to the visible world in all its triumphant materiality. They focused on the portrayal of human emotions and aesthetic objects; replaced the poet as prophet with the poet as craftsman; and promoted plastic models for poetry at the expense of music. In October 1911 Gumilev, together with another Acmeist, Sergei Mitrofanovich Gorodetsky, organized a literary workshop known as the “Tsekh poetov,” or Guild of Poets, at which readings of new verse were followed by a general critical discussion. Six poets formed the core of the new group: besides Gumilev, Gorodetsky, and Akhmatova—who was an active member of the guild and served as secretary at its meetings—it also included Mandel’shtam, Vladimir Ivanovich Narbut, and Mikhail Aleksandrovich Zenkevich. Several dozen other poets shared the Acmeist program at one time or another; the most active were Georgii Vladimirovich Ivanov, Mikhail Leonidovich Lozinsky, Elizaveta Iur’evna Kuzmina-Karavaeva, and Vasilii Alekseevich Komarovsky.

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

Sad Poetry Images in Urdu SMS in Urdu Pics by Wasi Shah Wallpapers About Love on Facebook in English

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